Leadership of your team

 

Empathy and perspective are two concepts well known Leadership author Simon Sinek speaks about in relation to leaders. He talks about the real job of a leader as not being in-charge but taking care of those in our charge.  How many leaders play the blame and shame game when things don’t go as planned?  Instead how would it be if leaders in aged care services worked in accordance with a Leader’s Oath.  My version is noted below as an example.

You may want to create your own for your organisation, or adopt this.

The Leader’s Oath

I focus on the betterment of this organisation above my own career needs

I  focus on accountability above the need to be popular

I focus on caring for those in my charge over being in charge

I focus on clarity above certainty

I share clear expectations

I hold myself accountable for all employees poor performance including my own

I welcome respectful challenges

I will table the tough issues

I treat all interactions as though my career depends on a successful outcome

I am committed to personal and professional development

I am focused on excellence.

 

While the above Leadership Oath forms a focus for clinical leadership, it’s necessary to make sure your nurses are familiar with the ARRC funding agreement responsibilities for Registered Nurses. These are also clearly defined in the HCSL policies and procedures to ensure they’re integrated into practice.  The ARRC includes time-frames for nursing documentation responsibilities, while the nursing council guidelines for delegation define staff delegation of staff working under the supervision of Registered Nurses are appropriate led and supported. When we refer to tabling the touch issues, one key aspect of leadership is holding staff accountable.  Nurses are often not keen to hold others responsible for their conduct and performance and therefore avoid performance managing staff when performance is below the expected standard.  This in turn means the service provided will be below the expected standard.  If you want to provide the best care and support to those in your care, these are skills you must learn and put into daily practice. To learn more about these skills and others needed for leading a team of care and support staff, go here.

Workplace Culture

Workplace culture is a term bandied around a lot but what does it actually mean and how can it be measured?  When I ask staff at facilities during training sessions what they see their point of difference is, they frequently reply saying ‘we’re friendly’, or ‘we care’ or ‘we provide a homely environment’.  While these are all nice to have, they would actually be expected as a basic standard.  They are not specific and not anything different to the care facility down the road.

Mary Barra, Chairwoman and CEO of General Motors (GM) states that at GM, they prefer to talk about behaviours rather than culture as behaviours can be changed very quickly and are apparent straight away. She talks about the need for rapid change with the inclusion of technology and advancements in artificial intelligence being used more frequently.  While those are starting to be present in some aged residential care settings, what is true of both GM and aged care is rapid change and the need to adapt quickly.  This isn’t going to happen by accident and needs clear direction, guidance, leadership and engagement of all those involved.

Mary Barra also refers to bringing products to market that bring people freedom, rather than talking about cars or transportation. She focuses on the outcome for their clients.   What is the key outcome you’re wanting to provide for those in your environment and how is that defined in your values?  How is it implemented by your staff and how do you measure success on those outcomes?

managers oath as I’ve mentioned before is a good place to start in defining the governance or leadership direction of organisations. Values and key performance indicators (KPIs) or quality objectives / measures need to align to this.To ensure consistent progress regular review of those KPIs or quality measures needs to occur and acted on according to the outcomes.  Policies and procedures to guide consistent best practice are an important part of ensuring clear direction for staff while setting parameters for performance.  Information reduces confusion and promotes change. Practice creates confidence not only in the staff but also in the resident and those observing their care.