HCSL Aged Care Software user feedback 2019

We asked a random group of clients for their responses in relation to using HCSL Aged Care Cloud based software.

What do you like best about the HCSL software and your current use of it? Below is their responses:

  • I like the layout of the LTCP and being able to load and access documents in the one programme.
  • At the end of the month the stats are all there done without me having to calculate; the system does that itself, love it, I print off the bar graphs for the staff to see each months results with the related information written up to show the story behind the data
  • The advantage of having HCSL software in our facility means enabling quick access to residents records for more coordinated, efficient care and securely share information with residents and other clinicians. Holly Lea is in the process of having most of the documentations online. Moving to electronic significantly improved our archiving processes and the need for physical storage space for paper records is also significantly reduced. Being able to search for a file or document from the computer rather than manually dig through a filing cabinet saves time for all of us.
  • Know it is kiwi made and covers aged care in NZ requirements
  • Analysis of data and logs for complaints and incidents
  • Ease of access and user friendly
  • Log in pages are bright and cheerful.
  • Everything is in one spot and easy to access.
  • Audit system, ease of use, easy access to forms.
  • Its clear and easy to use.
  • The Long Term Care Plan (LTCP) is much more concise, great feedback from the care staff, easy to read and understand.
  • Able to compare to the average when reviewing falls or infection rates.
  • Ability to analyse present the information e.g falls.
  • I like the ease of use – the easy to generate reports – everything being in a logical order that ties in very well with the paper files
  • Used correctly the system does pass audit, meets all the requirements of the MOH Standards.
  • Receiving the continual updates we know we always have the most updated material available to meet our MOH requirements
  • This is a central point for data gathering. We have the potential to have most information on line.
  • The system is new to our team, it is still getting established here. We are finding it quite easy to use.
  • Its web based which means I can look at it anytime and am fully up-to date always with whats happening
  • The audits are detailed, and clear
  • The bench-marking is great and easy – saving time – great reporting
  • All of it, Everything on the website is easy to find and I like the bench-marking.
  • I don’t think we utilize enough of the paperwork some things I am discovering now after 5 years of using it!
  • I like the simplicity of the software.
  • I like that it is integrated with quality documentation.
  • I like that it is cloud based.
  • I like the flat fee for use, rather than a fee the number of devices (tablets).
  • The ease of uploading resident photo and easy layout
  • Ability to easily track trends in adverse events.
  • The straight forward user friendly interface, the data analysis, the way corrective actions populate straight to the corrective actions log,

Risk Managing Contractors On-site

It’s easy to forget to check contractors staff changes and ensure your risk managing contractors on site is ongoing. Recently I was on site at a care facility when a sub-contractor was working there.  When spoken to, he appeared to speak very limited English. He left empty boxes, a Stanley knife in the main hallway and wet glue and loose carpet at the entrance to a resident’s room. No signage, no clean-up.  I couldn’t help but ask the provider what the contractor knew about health & safety legislation, his responsibilities and risks to residents as a result of his work practices.

The Health and Safety at Work 2015 increased the responsibility on PCBU’s in relation to risk management in the workplace.  When using the services of contractors, there are likely to be overlapping responsibilities. While residents reside in residential care facilities and therefore it’s their home, the legislation defines residential care as a workplace.  As such, contractors coming into your environment must provide evidence of following a health and safety policy and processes which reflects current legislation.

A copy of their document should be kept on file along with verification of contractors (and sub-contractors) orientation to site and confirmation of their acknowledgement of health & safety responsibilities.  These documents are included in the Safe and Appropriate Environment policy manual for services using HCSL in hardcopy and in-the-cloud online. Documents should be re-signed by contractors annually or when changes to the environment occur or a contractors personnel have changed.

Disaster Management should include security measures

This is a good time to be reminded that disaster management or your security policy may need to be extended to include management of threats, both internal and external to your organisation.  During the past years I’ve been personally involved with facilities where a resident entered the facility with a fire-arm, an intruder break-in during the night with a fire-arm, and another where intruders who entered the facility went into an occupied residents room. This last case related to intruders who had allegedly held-up the local bottle store earlier that same day.

Things happen which we don’t expect and we must be prepared as best we can.  It’s impossible to cover every possible eventuality but when events such as the shootings in Christchurch occur, it’s a reminder to ask are we doing enough?  For example, staff security rounds should be strictly enforced and documented to verify these were carried out. If you have surveillance cameras, where are your blind spots? If it’s the staff car park for staff going off duty late at night, improvements are desirable for staff safety. What about your processes for visitor verification? 

Security isn’t just about the people and environment but also about assets and information.  These should all be detailed in your policy documents.

HCSL are currently updating the security policies we provide ARC services to include reduction of risk from internal and external threats. This includes a procedure for lock-down. Let’s hope we never need to use it! 

For those of you wondering about how to debrief with your staff as a means to support them, there are some great resources available here.  For more resources on supporting others in relation to disaster type events, go here

Residential care education workshops

We provide a number of aged residential care education workshops throughout the year. Topics include:

  • Code of Rights (includes Advocacy, Informed consent, Privacy, Advance Directives, Open Disclosure, Complaint management)
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Cultural and Spiritual Safety
  • Restraint (including Enablers) safe practice and minimization
  • Challenging behavior management (including de-escalation strategies)
  • Clinical documentation and managing clinical risk
  • Quality and Risk management
  • Infection prevention and control surveillance
  • Death and dying – loss and grief
  • Leadership skills for managers and nurses
  • Intimacy and sexuality in the elderly
  • Skills for orientation ‘buddies’
  • Stress management and
  • Advanced communication skills

The workshops will initially be held in Christchurch however could be presented in other areas if the interest is high enough. Please feel free to contact us with your requests.