Bethsaida Resthome, Hospital and Retirement Village Testimonial

We are very pleased to have recently been granted 4 year MOH Certification! No corrective actions and three Continuous Improvements.

This follows on from a fully attained Partial Provisional Audit that was required prior to opening our two new wings earlier this year with no corrective actions.

Make no mistake!  HCSL policies, software and support have played a major part in these accomplishments.  The HCSL software we use means we have easy access to information in real time.

I started working with Gillian of HCSL shortly after I took on the role of Facility Nurse Manager at Bethsaida Retirement Village six years ago. The facility was not using Healthcare Compliance Solutions policies at the time and perhaps this was reflected in the previous audit results.

Gillian is always responsive to emails and phone calls which is critical when timely advice is required.

The HCSL regular newsletters are interesting with relevant and up to date information on issues affecting aged care.

Gillian is a lovely person to deal with. She is thoughtful, professional, pragmatic and I have always found her to be keen to help, with practical advice on any issues that might arise in the management of a retirement facility.

I thoroughly recommend HCSL to all aged care facilities.

 

Tracy Holdaway RN BN

Facility Nurse Manager

Bethsaida Retirement Village

August 2019

Mandated minimum nursing hours – will it work to ensure safety and productivity?

The question of whether mandated minimum nursing hours would work has been asked previously. The workload of care and nursing staff is frequently discussed with staff reporting they are pressured for time to complete all the necessary duties assigned.  The Nursing staff have different but over-lapping functions to care staff.  When reviewing your staffing, it’s important to include a number of factors into any review when looking at the productivity and efficiency of your team.

We suggest you look at not only leadership and skill-mix, which are vital for safe services but also consider other factors. These can include the location of high acuity needs residents within your service.  With an increase in the use of dual beds, the mix between rest home and higher acuity hospital level of care are now intermingled and not specifically allocated to one area of the building.  This means the Registered Nurses providing clinical monitoring and oversight may have to spread their attention to a much more fragmented and broader geographical area in your service than was previously the case.

The location of resources and time spent looking for items of use and equipment could be minimised if more thought was put into the design of new facilities and the locating and management of replenishing stores for ready access by staff as and where they need them.  Who does the running and fetching could also be considered in work roles so staff with high end clinical skills are spending the bulk of their time on performing functions specific to their role and skill.  Not doing tasks that could be better delegated to others.

After the recent sudden closure of a care facility in Australia without apparent planning or communication with families, there has been outrage that such a thing could happen.  The “Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced her Government would order fixed nurse-to-resident ratios in state-owned aged-care facilities.”  The ABC news report (19th July 2019) goes on to say “at least 50 per cent of staff having contact with residents in 16 publicly run aged-care centres to be nurses.”  I don’t know if by nurses they mean Registered Nurses only and not Enrolled nurses but I can’t help wonder if this alone will ensure safety.

One year on from Simon Wallace (NZACA CEO) reporting on staffing shortages, we haven’t seen any improvement it would seem!  In New Zealand an increasing proportion of our Registered Nurses have come to New Zealand to practice with no prior working knowledge of aged care services. They frequently have limited aged care related experience to conduct the complex assessment and clinical management of high acuity residents in a residential care setting.  This is not to diminish their value as we can’t provide the services needed otherwise.

What I’m trying to highlight in the current circumstances is, we’re frequently seeing nurses set up to fail or provide less than safe care as they simply don’t have the experience in this specialised field of nursing.  I recall conversations in the early 1990’s predicting a massive nursing shortage.  It appears that in the time-span between then and now, we haven’t addressed this issue.

We welcome comments and suggestions of how this could be addressed here in New Zealand before we end up in the depths of a staffing crisis which halts care.

What does a Physiotherapy programme look like in Aged Care?

Prior to contracting a Physiotherapist, or as part of your Physiotherapy service review process, you should consider what your goal is in having physiotherapy input.  These should include key values such as Meaningful Outcomes for residents.

We asked Jessie Snowden of On The Go Physio what should felt was important for a Physiotherapy programme to which she offered the following:

For us this means we carry out thorough assessments, find out what is important or meaningful to the resident, their whānau and how this impacts their functioning in the aged care environment. Our input with people can range from rehabilitation to a previous level of function.  This may be intensive physio input for a few weeks, to ensuring someone is safe and comfortable with appropriate seating and pressure care at the end of life (which could be one visit only).

This level of assessment means that you need to ‘budget’ for 40-60 minutes (sometimes longer for complicated admissions) of physiotherapy time for a new assessment and possibly longer if they are needing to make referrals, liaise with other services and family. Follow up visits will be shorter. It is recommended that if you have a set number of hours per week that your staff and the physiotherapist are clear on expectations and priorities. If you only contract 2 hours per week it is not fair to have 10 new assessments on your ‘urgent’ list!

Some facilities have a set standard of 6 monthly reviews of all their residents. Although we do undertake these if asked, it is often more meaningful to use physiotherapy skills for those residents who may improve with input, or who your staff need assistance with due to functional decline. We suggest  if a 6 monthly review is wanted, then the RN is able to carry this out by considering if there have been changes in mobility, falls rates or other physical changes affecting function. If not then your physiotherapy dollar could be better spent on residents with clear rehabilitation needs or declining function.  The key goal here being to optimise mobility and maintain as much independence as possible.

Once the Physiotherapy service is up and running you can expect your physiotherapist to provide a clearly written assessment and a clear treatment plan, including either a discharge comment or a review date. Ideally you will maintain data related to Physiotherapy input and be able to see clearly if your allocated time is meeting the needs of your staff and residents.

Finally consider which residents will be eligible for physiotherapy assessments. If you are funding a Physiotherapy service you may choose to extend this to your hospital level and rest home level of care residents but not to independent studio units/apartments as these residents will usually be eligible for DHB funded services. Some DHBs will happily provide physiotherapy to rest home level of care residents and some put guidelines around who they will see. Depending on your DHB and care philosophy you may choose only to fund Physiotherapy services to hospital level of care residents or to extend this to rest home. In our company we work with aged care facilities who operate under both of these models and the key is to have it clear to both your Physiotherapist and staff who are completing referrals.

Spend your dollar wisely!

A final note here. Physiotherapists are highly skilled healthcare professionals who will be an asset to your team. The days of Physiotherapists spending all their time on walking programmes are long gone and you should set your expectations high for a physiotherapist who will add quality of life to your residents and cost benefit to your organisation. To use your physiotherapist wisely I strongly recommend you have the expectation that your care staff will have time to walk with people who are safe to do so.  We also encourage you to employ or allocate a Physiotherapy assistant hours into your roster to implement Physiotherapy plans. For information on using Physiotherapy assistants please look at an earlier article here .

This article was kindly contributed by Jessie Snowdon – Director of On the Go Physio. On the Go Physio provide physiotherapy services to over 20 facilities in Christchurch and Moving and Handling training to many more facilities and the CDHB.

Culture Change in Long Term Care

Culture is a word we hear a lot and goes hand in hand with the concept of culture change.  In this article I’d like to touch on how to facilitate culture change and why it is beneficial to your long term care setting.  Let’s face it, aged residential care in New Zealand is changing rapidly and this impacts the experience of residents, staff and visitors to long term care settings. It impacts their desire to be in your care facility or to move somewhere else. This applies to be both residents and staff.  Families often choose the care provider for their elderly relatives.  What do they perceive when they visit you?

There are also barriers and challenges to creating and sustaining a definable and deliberate culture. The experience of the residents and staff is a result of the culture (behaviours) which should be aligned to your organisation values, mission and goals.  There are well publicised workforce shortages and high turnover of staff. Long term care is also in the middle of change from paper-based systems to electronic storage and management of information. The environment in which care is being provided is also changing through new construction of buildings from a institution to non-institutional. The atmosphere being created by those within the long term aged care residential setting is changing to a more relaxed feel.

Nursing care  and direct support is now also being provided within retirement village studios, apartments, villas, homes.  This means a change of not only the context of care.  Ensuring person centred care where each individual feels seen, heard and respected takes consistent focus and strong leadership.  Not always easy in a industry that is changing in so many ways. I wrote in a previous article on workplace culture that behaviours could be a better point of focus rather than simply focusing conversation on culture as a concept.

The behaviours which support a culture you can be proud of and one that sets you as an industry leader, require a long term focus and not just a one time exercise.  The strong leadership needed along with education and ongoing communication is key to setting a desirable culture.  Have you aligned your staff, management and Governance behaviours with your organisation vision and mission statements?  Behaviours reflect actions and they can be optimal actions, good actions, poor actions or non-action.  All will have an outcome which impacts the residents experience and determine how they feel about residing in your long term aged residential care setting.

For change to occur there needs to be a focus on improvement, a reason to change which residents and their families see as beneficial.  We tend to stick to doing what we’ve always done unless we can see a personal gain or something which provides a sense of satisfaction on a personal level.  What’s in it for me?  Culture change is not something that’s going to be achieved from a top-down approach. It’s going to take engagement from all levels of the organisation and create wins for those involved. Without perceived gains or wins, people stay stuck in old habits which don’t fit the new expectations of those seeking care and support.

If you’re the manager or CEO and delegate a ‘change management’ process to someone else, then expect to check in later to find wonderful results without your direct involvement and engagement, you may be disappointed.  Culture change is a team effort. To achieve change, everyone needs to participate.  They need to believe in the outcomes you’re trying to achieve with whatever strategies or initiatives you put in place.

Who is going to lead change?  There is an old saying that everything flows from the top down and this is also true of culture.  If the Board are dysfunctional then there should be no surprise when staff working at all levels of the organisation are dysfunctional. How is communication about strategies of change being done to gain buy-in? How are you going to measure your change initiatives to find out if you’ve been successful?  How are you going to ensure the desired culture is maintained?  There are a number of tools (mostly overseas based) which can be used to start this process. Here is a free online culture change assessment tool you could use.

What is the experience of your resident and your staff on a daily basis?  Would they recommend you to others in a way to reflects loyalty to your care facility as a preferred place to live or work? If not, what are you going to do about it?

Mattresses – are your mattresses causing harm?

Mattresses aren’t just something to lie on but if not maintained and cared for appropriately, also have the potential for causing harm.

As I travel a lot for work, I have the opportunity to test many different mattresses, all with varying degrees of comfort.  This reminds me how difficult it must be for those who may be suffering painful joints to get a good night’s sleep.  Appropriate mattresses are not only required to reduce pain from positioning discomfort but also reducing risk to residents. This include ensuring the mattresses are of a suitable standard and fit for purpose.

I’ve seen a number of mattresses which had hardened and torn linings and were well past being able to provide much comfort or an appropriate degree of pressure support. Some had masking tape used in an attempt to cover splits in the mattress cover.  Others had holes in and were badly stained from exposure to body substances.  As the residents in care are becoming frailer, with increasing acuity, the need for ensuring appropriate pressure support is crucial to preventing pressure injuries, maintaining comfort and maximizing the opportunity for good sleep.

There is the potential for old and in poor condition mattresses to be a potential source for infection transmission.  For those of you operating newer facilities, this may not yet be an issue. For older facilities, part of stock and resource control should include mattress stock checks to verify they are in fact still fit for use.  When conducting checks, determine the mix of mattress types you have and speak with your supplier about a replacement programme should this be necessary.  As mattresses differ, so do beds and it’s important to make sure the mattress you use is appropriate for the particular bed type and size.

When reviewing your mattress stocks and purchasing new mattresses you might like to think about the following factors:

  • Only purchase from reputable suppliers. Review the manufacturer’s instructions for use to ensure they include verification of cleaning instructions and ask about preventative maintenance. This may include staffing training e.g. via the use of online training videos or instruction booklets.
  • Make sure you record the date of purchase and do your best to track each mattress and pillow to maximize warranties and make plans for replacement. Add the item to the facility cleaning schedules for regular cleaning and drying of exterior surfaces which should be durable, water-repellent and quick drying. They should also be seamless, if possible. When there are seams or edges, much sure these are situated away from resident skin contact to prevent absorption of liquid into interior and increased friction.
  • All seams must be tightly closed and sealed. Masking or packaging tape is not appropriate for sealing. When mattresses become worn and tear, you might like to have a supplier representative review to see what options are available for repair or replacement.
  • When reviewing the condition of mattresses, inspect all mattress surfaces, covers, seams and zippers for proper function and damage including wear, tears, splits, cracks, punctures, permanent odours and stains. If visible contamination from body substances are present, determine appropriate steps (eg. replacement or repair).
  • To support longevity of mattresses, remind staff not to place any furniture or sharp objects on mattresses. Protect the mattress with mattress protectors only if advised by the supplier this is appropriate. A number of pressure support functions in mattresses may be adversely impacted by the use of additional mattress coverings to do check.
  • Cleaning and disinfection must be considered in relation to mattresses, covers, wedges, cushions and pillows which are all classified as non-critical medical devices. Clean and low-level disinfect according to the manufacturer’s instructions between different resident use and when visibly soiled. Some mattress covers are removable for laundering so remember to verify which ones can be cleaned separately.
  • Remove damaged or stained items from service and report these in your maintenance book or to the Manager. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for use and disposal of damaged mattresses, covers, and pillows, and in accordance with infection prevention and control guidelines.
  • Ensure when using alternating therapy type mattresses that there is a process in place for a shift by shift verification that the pressure is maintained at the current level for the individual resident utilizing that mattress. If you plan to use an air alternating topper pad on a mattress, ensure it’s suitable for the mattress as depending on heights and size, it may not be appropriate.

Harm prevention can also be supported with advances in technology such as Pressure Monitoring sensing devices to ensure appropriate pressure distribution.  I’m not aware of anyone who can rent or lease out Pressure Mappers in NZ. However Cubro have one that they can bring onsite to facilities for training and education. Make contact with your supplier to see if they can assist if this could be useful for you.

Also remember that other devices used in beds should be checked  as well to ensure they are still safe and appropriate for use eg; wedges, rolls, pillows, seat cushions, mattress covers (where these are appropriate for use), bed sensor monitoring pads.  For reading on how to choose the best mattress option for your needs go here.

For more related information view here.

Article compiled by Gillian Robinson (RN, BN, Lead Auditor) for Healthcare Compliance Solutions Ltd.

Critical thinking – the foundation of good nursing practice

There are lots of ‘trendy’ words in each work environment but one of the most important concepts which appears to be increasingly missing particularly in aged care nursing is that of critical thinking and reflective practice. Critical thinking is the core foundation of good nursing practice.

It is essential to evaluate what is occurring clinically for those in care and regularly reviewing what is being done for each individual resident along with what else needs to be done in order to provide the best care. The skills of critical thinking may not be instinctive for example for those nurses coming from a schooling system which promotes ‘rote’ learning and deters from challenging senior staff.  To question another may be seen in some settings as disrespectful however in the field of clinical care, to challenge and question is essential.  The attributes of those who critically think and reflect on nursing practice and care outcomes use evidence-based practice (EBP) guidelines including current EBP policies and procedures to form decisions.

Some of the skills of critical thinking are more important than others and certainly the ability to reflect while communicating with other members of the team is essential to safe and person centred care.  The nurse who has developed critical thinking skills is able to interpret, understand and explain the meaning of information. This can be event based or data based eg; reading lab result forms. Investigating possible interventions based on the information at hand and analysing which will achieve a desired outcome is also part of reflecting and critically evaluating a clinical scenario.  Assessing the value of information to determine it’s relevance, reliability and credibility in relation to a particular clinical presentation is also necessary.

There are potential barriers to optimising clinical outcomes by clinical staff when a pre-determined bias or fixed mind-set are applied to a set of data or resident clinical presentation. It’s only in the bringing together of information through evaluation, analysis, communicating, referencing EBP guidelines and a growth mind-set that care can be optimised.

Click here to read more on critical thinking.

 

 

RN – Manager, Kaiapoi Lodge Resthome and Hospital – February 2017

We are a medium sized rest home and hospital. The complexities of the various standards means that without a product such as HCSL we would find it difficult to function. Health Care Compliance Solutions Ltd has ensured we stay up to date and compliant in all areas of our industry.

The recent introduction of the online tool has been a massive invaluable boost, all staff now have access to the latest documents online.

Never before have we been able to compare ourselves against industry. Instant access to current documents, analysis of events and graphical representation are just a click away. Adverse events and infections are recorded and compared against industry.  The ability to log complaints, restraints and complete internal audit has aided in our ability to close the quality circle.

With HCSL we no longer need to worry about the policies and procedures we just need to focus on the implementation.

 

 

Jonathan Prangnell

Registered Nurse/Manager 

Kaiapoi Lodge Residential Care Ltd  – February 2017

Policies and Procedures folders

Policies & Procedures

Policy No. Titles for residential care service policies and procedures
CSM Care Services Manual introduction page
CS1 Admission to hospital for medical emergency
CS2 Adverse Health Policy
CS3 Anti-coagulation monitor
CS4 Warfarin blood monitoring results
CS5
CS6 Bereavement / Termination Care policy
CS6 A Bereavement notification form (and resource material)
CS7 Blood Glucose monitor form
CS7 A Blood sugar levels record sheet
CS7 B Diabetes Testing and Treatment sheet
CS7 C Blood glucose monitor form
CS8 Blood sugar equipment check
CS9 Blood sugar testing
CS10 Case Conference for care plan review forms
CS11 Care Plan Review Schedule
CS11 A Doctors Visits Schedule
CS12 Catheter management policy
CS12 A Catheter change schedule
CS13 Continence management policy
CS13 A Continence assessment form
CS13 B Continence Voiding Chart and Bowel chart
CS14 Clinical Management Policy (includes resource directly and key responsibilities)
CS14 A Robinson’s Resident Acuity & Clinical Risk Assessment
CS15 Challenging behavior assessment form
CS15 A Behavior monitoring chart
CS15 B Challenging behavior assessment form
CS16 Diversional Therapy – Quality of life policy
CS16 A Diversional Therapy – Residential profile
CS16 B Diversional Therapy – Care plan
CS16 C Diversional Therapy – Activities attendance register
CS16 D Diversional Therapy – Care plan evaluation form
CS16 E Sample Activities Calendar
CS17
CS18
CS19 Falls Prevention Programme
CS19 A Falls Risk Assessment – Coombe’s Assessment Form
CS19 B Repeated Falls Analysis – Accident Summary
CS19 C Resident Mobility Assessment Chart
CS19 D Resident Mobility Guide Form
CS19 E Post Falls Investigation Form
CS20 Fluid Balance Chart
CS20 A Daily Fluid Balance Chart (more reflective of hospital level care)
CS21 Handover sheet
CS22 Health status and clinical risk assessment policy
CS22 A Health status and clinical risk assessment form
CS23 ‘Health Promotion’ Initiative Planner
CS24 Lab form – Pathology report storage sheet
CS25
CS26 Long Term Care Plan (Including InterRai prompts and Evaluations)
CS26 A Short term care plan for acute issues
CS26 B Treatment Sheet
CS26 C Daily Care Summary (for inside wardrobe reference in resident room)
CS27 Care Plan multi-disciplinary review policy (and associated form)
CS28 Administration of medication policy – different version supplies for those using Medimap / 1 Chart
CS28 A Administration of medication procedure – different version supplies for those using Medimap / 1 Chart
CS28 B Glucagon Administration
CS28 C Blister pack contents verification
CS28 D Medication competency assessment forms
CS28 E Insulin competency assessment form
CS28 F Medication changes / order notification
CS28 G Medication order sheet – supplied for non-electronic system users
CS28 H Medication Signing sheet – supplied for non-electronic system users
CS28 I PRN medication signing sheet – supplied for non-electronic system users
CS28 J Medication error analysis form
CS28 K  Medication error analysis form
CS28 L  Respite / short term resident medication signing
CS28 M  Self Medication resident initial competency reviews
CS28 N  Self medicating – shift by shift verification
CS28 O Medication Returned to Pharmacy form
CS28 P Medication Key Holder Register
CS28 Q Injection Register form
CS30 Nebulizer usage and maintenance policy
CS31 Neurological Recordings policy
CS31 A Neurological Observation sheet
CS32 Podiatrist Service agreement
CS33 Pain Management policy
CS33 A Pain – Detailed Assessment form
CS33 B Pain – Review Assessment form
CS33 C Pain – ABBEY pain scale (for non-verbal resident)
CS33 D Pain – ABBEY pain scale reviews form
CS34 Personal hygiene and grooming policy
CS35 Pharmacy Service Agreement
CS36 Temp, Pulse and Respirations monitor form
CS36 A General Recordings record (optional use)
CS36 B Weight and Blood Pressure Monitor form
CS36 C Blood Pressure Monitor form
CS37 Pressure Injury Risk policy
CS37 A Pressure Injury Clinical Procedures
CS37 B Pressure Injury risk assessment form
CS38 Nursing (care) progress notes form
CS38 A Pressure Note Writing Guidelines
CS39 Medical Notes progress forms
CS40 Restraint / Enabler use policy and procedure
CS40 A Restraint / Enabler Authorisation form
CS40 B Restraint / Enabler Monitoring record
CS40 C Restraint / Enabler Register
CS40 D Restraint / Enabler Assessment prior to use
CS40 E Restraint / Enabler monitoring guidelines
CS40 F Restraint Approval Group Review meeting
CS40 G Restraint / Enabler Review form
CS41 RN – Medical practitioner communication
CS42 Sleep and Comfort policy
CS42 A Sleep Monitor form
CS43 Turn Chart for bed-ridden resident
CS44 Weight Management policy
CS44 A Weight Monitoring chart
CS45 Wound Management policy
CS45 A Wound care plan / dressing schedule
CS45 B Wound care competency assessment
Policy No. Title for residential care food services policies and procedures
FSM Food Services Manual introduction page
FS1 Admission Food & Nutrition Information
FS1 A Breakfast Order forms
FS2 Food brought into the facility
FS3 Food Safety policy
FS4 Food Services for the Elderly
FS4 A Food & Nutrition guidelines for the older person
FS4 B General tips for helping older persons eat etc.
FS4 C Ageing Process and Care Provisions Issues
FS4 D Eating Difficulties – Dry or Sore Mouth
FS4 E Fluids – Preventing Constipation
FS4 F Food and Medication Interactions
FS4 G Vitamin and Mineral Supplements
FS5 Food Services Questionnaire for Residents
FS6 Safety Checklist for Kitchen Services Areas
FS7
FS7 A Sample Menu – Winter 1
FS7 B Sample Menu – Winter 2
FS7 C Sample Menu – Winter 3
FS8 Microbiological Data Sheets – food Safety
FS9 Food services ordering and monitoring
FS10 Food services preferred suppliers
FS11 Food/fluid Intake Chart
FS12 Resident Food / Fluids Preferences at a glance form
FS13 Food Services Staff Responsibilities
FS14 Food Storage Policy
FS15 Food Thawing Policy
FS16 Meal Service Policy
FS16 A Resident Meal Receipt Verification Form
Policy No. Policy Title for Residential Care Service Delivery policies and procedures
SD1 Acquisitions Order Form
SD2 Common Abbreviations
SD3 Communication Policy
SD3 A   –  Sensory Communication Policy
SD4 Clinical documentation and report writing policy
SD5 Day Care Policy
SD5A Day Care – Client Care Plan
SD6 Family / Whanau / Resident Representative Contact sheet
SD7 Reassessment Referral Policy
SD8 Resident Inquiry for Admission Form
SD8 A Resident Inquiry for Admission Form (alternative form)
SD9 Resident Medical File Checklist
SD10 Transfer / Discharge of Residents Policy
SD10 A Transfer / Discharge Form
SD11 Medical Services Contract
SD12 Authorised Signatures register
SD13 Change of Resident Status Notification
SD14 Internal Telephone Numbers Listing

Quality Systems Development / Support

Bogged down in paperwork? Wasting your time re-inventing the wheel, creating documents to meet audit requirements? 

  • Are you spending unnecessary time on researching, developing and reviewing policies and procedures?
  • You don’t need to do this any longer!
  • You can now get back to doing what you enjoy!

Healthcare Compliance Solutions Limited (HCSL) supports you in achieving Certification and contractual audit outcomes through provision of a completely integrated tried and tested quality system. This system consists of a set of policy and procedure manuals accompanied by the relevant clinical practice forms. Everything you need in customised ready to use hard-copy manuals AND accessible in-the-cloud   To view a brief video demo of the system click here.

This documented Quality System has been developed and continuously refined by us over the past 15 years taking into consideration all legislation and contractual requirements for Aged Residential Care setting.

Our Quality System package which continues to pass numerous audits in multiple facilities nationally for both Certification and District Health Board contract (ARRC) audit purposes consists of:

  • Policy and procedure manuals to guide meeting compliance requirements
  • Fully indexed and cross referenced
  • Incorporates the requirements of the Health & Safety at Work; and Food Safety Act legislation
  • System accompanied by coaching and mentoring services
  • Flexibility to enable modification to meet the specific requirements of your facility.
  • User friendly format
  • Written in practical common sense terminology

Service contracts ensure ongoing updates are provided as regulatory requirements change.  A number of our clients have achieved Four Years Certification.

Policy and Procedure manuals are grouped as:

  • Human Resources
  • Organisation Management (includes quality  and risk)
  • Entry (admission) and Consumer Rights
  • Safe and Appropriate Environment (Health and Safety; and Infection Prevention and Control)
  • Services delivery (care services)
  • Food Services
  • Village (RVA related policies and procedures for those with Village facilities)

During service provision HCSL work alongside you to ensure that your system is adapted to your specific needs and provides guidance for consistent service which in turn retains happy clients for your facility. Where clinical practices are identified as not complying with current accepted best practice, you will receive mentoring and support in the change management process to achieve improvements.

Don’t waste any more of your precious time – make contact today to gain access to a System that will support you in achieving Certification, and can be maintained on your behalf!

For more information on our national NZ designed bench-marking and online quality and risk programmes, read more here or contact us

Contact us now for more information.

Tracey Dimmock-Rump – Owner / Manager

Amberley Resthome and Retirement Studios

“I was referred to Gillian Robinson (HSCL) through a colleague as I knew I needed expertise help when starting out in the aged care industry. Little did I know I would get the best!
Working alongside someone as passionate as Gillian is a privilege which reflects the level of commitment she makes to you as a client. From the phone calls and emails, to the training sessions, to the continuous improvement guidance and depth of knowledge that is implemented in our system. I can’t thank Gillian enough for her support and have no hesitation in recommending her services to anybody in the healthcare sector.

She knows this industry inside and out and has played a pivotal role in our success as an organisation”.

 

Tracey Dimmock-Rump – Owner / Manager